Justin Baker, MD
Disclosures: Nothing to disclose
SciENCV PDF

OMB No. 0925-0001 and 0925-0002 (Rev. 10/15 Approved Through 10/31/2018)


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

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NAME: Baker, Justin

eRA COMMONS USER NAME (credential, e.g., agency login):

POSITION TITLE: Director, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program

EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and residency training if applicable.)

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION

DEGREE
(if applicable)

START DATE
MM/YYYY

END DATE
MM/YYYY

FIELD OF STUDY

Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, OK

BA

08/1993

05/1997

Biochemistry/Pre-medicine

University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

MD

08/1997

05/2001

Medicine

A. Personal Statement

As a pediatric oncologist, palliative care physician, vice-chair of the ethics committee and patient-reported outcomes and Phase I and end-of-life care clinical investigator at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, I am intimately aware of the distress experienced by children with advanced cancer and the ethical and end-of-life/bereavement issues surrounding their disease progression. I have the training, expertise, and leadership to mentor Dr. Jennifer Snaman in her current project outlined in her NIH LRP grant proposal. I currently serve as the Chief of the Division of Quality of Life and Palliative Care at St. Jude as well as the medical director of our Quality of Life for All (QOLA) Service – the St. Jude palliative care team. I also serve as the Director of our large Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship program. My research interests include ethical considerations surrounding enrollment in Phase I clinical trials, AYA palliative oncology care, end-of-life decision making, integrating palliative care into the ongoing care of children with cancer as well as patient-reported outcomes and pain and symptom control in the context of pediatric oncology care. I have received significant extramural funding for my research and I have participated in >30 studies related to pediatric palliative care. I have authored >100 academic works on palliative care subjects within the context of pediatric oncology. In sum, I am a recognized international expert and leader in the field of Pediatric Palliative Oncology.

1.      Kaye EC, Snaman JM, Baker JN. Pediatric Palliative Oncology: Bridging Silos of Care Through an Embedded Model. J Clin Oncol. 2017 Aug 20;35(24):2740-2744. PubMed PMID: 28700277.

2.      Levine DR, Mandrell BN, Sykes A, Pritchard M, Gibson D, Symons HJ, Wendler D, Baker JN. Patients' and Parents' Needs, Attitudes, and Perceptions About Early Palliative Care Integration in Pediatric Oncology. JAMA Oncol. 2017 Sep 1;3(9):1214-1220. PubMed PMID: 28278329.

3.      Johnson LM, Torres C, Sykes A, Gibson DV, Baker JN. The bereavement experience of adolescents and early young adults with cancer: Peer and parental loss due to death is associated with increased risk of adverse psychological outcomes. PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0181024. PubMed PMID: 28832654; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5568383.

4.      Baker JN, Levine DR, Hinds PS, Weaver MS, Cunningham MJ, Johnson L, Anghelescu D, Mandrell B, Gibson DV, Jones B, Wolfe J, Feudtner C, Friebert S, Carter B, Kane JR. Research Priorities in Pediatric Palliative Care. J Pediatr. 2015 Aug;167(2):467-70.e3. PubMed PMID: 26028284; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4516589.

B. Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

2001 - 2004

Pediatric Resident, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

2003 - 2004

Chief Resident, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

2004 - 2007

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellow, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

2007 - 2012

Assistant Member, Departments of Pediatric Medicine and Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

2011 -

Chief, Division of Quality of Life and Palliative Care, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

2011 -

Director, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

2012 -

Associate Member, Department of Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

2007 -

Fellow (FAAP), American Academy of Pediatrics

2007 -

Fellow (FAAHPM), American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2007 -

Member, American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

2007 -

Member, Children's Oncology Group

Honors

1993

Milwaukee Youth of the Year, Rotary Club

1997

Outstanding Chemistry Senior, Summa Cum Laude, Valedictorian, Oral Roberts University

2007

Distinguished Service Award, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

2008

Young Investigator Award, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2008

Research Award (Best Paper), American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2010

Clinical Improvement Award - Quality of Life Service – Founding Team Member, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital

2011

Top 40 Under 40 Awardee, Memphis Business Journal

2012

Fellow, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2012

Cunniff-Dixon National Physician Award , The Hastings Center

2013

Family-Centered Care Champion Award , St Jude Children’s Research Hospital

2013

Encore! Award, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital

2014

Inspirational Leader in Hospice and Palliative Medicine , American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2015

Appointed to the Academic HPM Leadership Council, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

2017

Outstanding BC Alumnus of the Year Award, ORU

2017

Healthcare Heroes Honoree , Memphis Business Journal

2017

Communicator of the Year, St Jude Children's Research Hospital

C. Contribution to Science

1.                  I am viewed as a leader in the field of pediatric palliative care and sought after for my ability to envision how best to integrate QoL and Palliative Care concepts into the ongoing care of children with cancer. Under my leadership, our group at St Jude is defining the nascent field of pediatric palliative oncology. I co-led the effort to create a model designed to facilitate integration of palliative care principles into the care of suffering children and their families - the Individualized Care Planning and Coordination (ICPC) Model. This model emphasizes relationships and employs a patient- and family-centered approach in information delivery, needs assessment, and understanding the patient’s and family’s illness experience. Attention to these relational aspects of care is of utmost importance as parents’ perceptions of quality care emphasize caring and communication themselves more than any specific interventions or biomedical parameters. Integration of the ICPC model and QoL/PPC concepts aim to enhance communication and quality of life among patients and families by supporting therapeutic relationships and allowing caregivers to more effectively navigate the uncertainty of the illness trajectory in children with cancer. We have now published numerous studies demonstrating the positive outcomes resulting from the integration of palliative care into the ongoing care of children with cancer.

a.                              Kaye EC, Snaman JM, Baker JN. Pediatric Palliative Oncology: Bridging Silos of Care Through an Embedded Model. J Clin Oncol. 2017 Aug 20;35(24):2740-2744. PubMed PMID: 28700277.

b.                              Snaman JM, Kaye EC, Lu JJ, Sykes A, Baker JN. Palliative Care Involvement Is Associated with Less Intensive End-of-Life Care in Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Patients. J Palliat Med. 2017 May;20(5):509-516. PubMed PMID: 28099053.

c.                              Levine DR, Johnson LM, Snyder A, Wiser RK, Gibson D, Kane JR, Baker JN. Integrating Palliative Care in Pediatric Oncology: Evidence for an Evolving Paradigm for Comprehensive Cancer Care. J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2016 Jun;14(6):741-8. PubMed PMID: 27283167; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5357562.

d.                              Kaye EC, Friebert S, Baker JN. Early Integration of Palliative Care for Children with High-Risk Cancer and Their Families. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2016 Apr;63(4):593-7. PubMed PMID: 26579997.

2.                  Phase I childhood cancer trials are critical for the development of new anti-cancer therapies. Nearly all children enrolled in these trials will die. Parents report the decision of whether or not to enroll their child on a Phase I trial is one of the most difficult decisions they must make for their sick child. Additionally, physicians report a tension between presenting reasonable options and a truthful prognosis while still maintaining hope. I have worked diligently to help better understand this decision-making process. Our group at St Jude is well-positioned to lead research efforts surrounding communication and decision-making in the context of Phase I clinical trials.

a.                              Johnson LM, Leek AC, Drotar D, Noll RB, Rheingold SR, Kodish ED, Baker JN. Practical communication guidance to improve phase 1 informed consent conversations and decision-making in pediatric oncology. Cancer. 2015 Jul 15;121(14):2439-48. PubMed PMID: 25873253; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4490010.

b.                              Levine DR, Johnson LM, Mandrell BN, Yang J, West NK, Hinds PS, Baker JN. Does phase 1 trial enrollment preclude quality end-of-life care? Phase 1 trial enrollment and end-of-life care characteristics in children with cancer. Cancer. 2015 May 1;121(9):1508-12. PubMed PMID: 25557437; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4685940.

c.                              Baker JN, Leek AC, Salas HS, Drotar D, Noll R, Rheingold SR, Kodish ED. Suggestions from adolescents, young adults, and parents for improving informed consent in phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Cancer. 2013 Dec 1;119(23):4154-61. PubMed PMID: 24006119.

d.                              Yap TY, Yamokoski AD, Hizlan S, Zyzanski SJ, Angiolillo AL, Rheingold SR, Baker JN, Kodish ED. Informed consent for pediatric phase 1 cancer trials: physicians' perspectives. Cancer. 2010 Jul 1;116(13):3244-50. PubMed PMID: 20564626; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2892009.

3.                  Integrating the child voice into the ongoing care of children with cancer is critical. Children as young as 6 years old (and likely even younger) can understand complex decision-making and can respond to symptom assessment tools. Child patient involvement and patient-reported outcomes are noted to to be underutilized and underrepresented in the pediatric oncology literature. I am working to better understand how the child's voice can be directly incorporated into their ongoing care to ensure the collection of accurate and complete data about their experience.

a.                              Reeve BB, McFatrich M, Pinheiro LC, Freyer DR, Basch EM, Baker JN, Withycombe JS, Sung L, Mack JW, Waldron MK, Mowbray C, Palma D, Hinds PS. Cognitive Interview-Based Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events in Adolescents with Cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2017 Apr;53(4):759-766. PubMed PMID: 28062347; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5374011.

b.                              Weaver MS, Reeve BB, Baker JN, Martens CE, McFatrich M, Mowbray C, Palma D, Sung L, Tomlinson D, Withycombe J, Hinds P. Concept-elicitation phase for the development of the pediatric patient-reported outcome version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Cancer. 2016 Jan 1;122(1):141-8. PubMed PMID: 26421973; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4707103.

c.                              Baker JN, Leek AC, Salas HS, Drotar D, Noll R, Rheingold SR, Kodish ED. Suggestions from adolescents, young adults, and parents for improving informed consent in phase 1 pediatric oncology trials. Cancer. 2013 Dec 1;119(23):4154-61. PubMed PMID: 24006119.

d.                              Reeve BB, Withycombe JS, Baker JN, Hooke MC, Lyons JC, Mowbray C, Wang J, Freyer DR, Joffe S, Sung L, Tomlinson D, Gold SH, Hinds PS. The first step to integrating the child's voice in adverse event reporting in oncology trials: a content validation study among pediatric oncology clinicians. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 Jul;60(7):1231-6. PubMed PMID: 23335328.

4.                  Parents and healthcare providers report end-of-life decision making in the context of pediatric oncology as an urgent need for study and an area requiring great support and improvement from the clinical and research communities. I have led national and institutional efforts at better understanding decision-making in the context of progressive, incurable cancer. The majority of this work has come in the context of understanding Phase I informed consent, but I have also explored other areas of decision-making such as autopsy, placing a "DNR" order and hospice enrollment. I am viewed as an expert in these areas within the overlap of the fields of pediatric oncology and hospice and palliative medicine.

a.                              Baker JN, Rai S, Liu W, Srivastava K, Kane JR, Zawistowski CA, Burghen EA, Gattuso JS, West N, Althoff J, Funk A, Hinds PS. Race does not influence do-not-resuscitate status or the number or timing of end-of-life care discussions at a pediatric oncology referral center. J Palliat Med. 2009 Jan;12(1):71-6. PubMed PMID: 19284266; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2941671.

b.                              Maurer SH, Hinds PS, Spunt SL, Furman WL, Kane JR, Baker JN. Decision making by parents of children with incurable cancer who opt for enrollment on a phase I trial compared with choosing a do not resuscitate/terminal care option. J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jul 10;28(20):3292-8. PubMed PMID: 20498399; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2903327.

c.                              Baker JN, Kane JR, Rai S, Howard SC, Hinds PS. Changes in medical care at a pediatric oncology referral center after placement of a do-not-resuscitate order. J Palliat Med. 2010 Nov;13(11):1349-52. PubMed PMID: 21034279; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3001240.

d.                              Baker JN, Windham JA, Hinds PS, Gattuso JS, Mandrell B, Gajjar P, West NK, Hammarback T, Broniscer A. Bereaved parents' intentions and suggestions about research autopsies in children with lethal brain tumors. J Pediatr. 2013 Aug;163(2):581-6. PubMed PMID: 23433673; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3664241.

5.                  The death of a child is an unimaginably devastating event. It results in profound grief and significant psycho-social and physical morbidities in parents and other care providers. The grief journey of parents who experienced the oncology-related death of their child is poorly understood. What little data exist demonstrate clearly this journey is complex and necessitates the utilization of newer models of bereavement. We are one of the leaders in understanding the needs of parents and caregivers after the death of their child due to cancer. Our research has demonstrated the critical nature of relationships and has explored parents' perceptions of the grief and bereavement experience.

a.                              Snaman JM, Kaye EC, Levine DR, Cochran B, Wilcox R, Sparrow CK, Noyes N, Clark L, Avery W, Baker JN. Empowering Bereaved Parents Through the Development of a Comprehensive Bereavement Program. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2017 Apr;53(4):767-775. PubMed PMID: 28042068.

b.                              Snaman JM, Kaye EC, Cunningham MJ, Sykes A, Levine DR, Mahoney D, Baker JN. Going straight to the source: A pilot study of bereaved parent-facilitated communication training for pediatric subspecialty fellows. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2017 Jan;64(1):156-162. PubMed PMID: 27605076.

c.                              Snaman JM, Kaye EC, Torres C, Gibson DV, Baker JN. Helping parents live with the hole in their heart: The role of health care providers and institutions in the bereaved parents' grief journeys. Cancer. 2016 Sep 1;122(17):2757-65. PubMed PMID: 27244654.

d.                              Snaman JM, Kaye EC, Torres C, Gibson D, Baker JN. Parental Grief Following the Death of a Child from Cancer: The Ongoing Odyssey. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2016 Sep;63(9):1594-602. PubMed PMID: 27187020.

D. Additional Information: Research Support and/or Scholastic Performance

Ongoing Research Support

CA175759-02 , NCI

REEVES, BRYCE (PI)

04/01/13-03/31/18

Patient Reported CT-CAE

The goal of this 5-year, multi-center study is to design and validate a pediatric self-report and caregiver-proxy report measure (in English and Spanish) of subjective adverse events (AEs) experienced by children undergoing treatment for cancer that will be used to screen and validly measure AEs in pediatric oncology trials.

Role: Co-Investigator

1 R01 NR016720-01, NIH/NCI

Wolfe, Joanne (PI)

01/01/17-01/01/22

The PediQUEST Response Intervention Study

A multisite, parallel, randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of an early palliative care intervention, the Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology Response to Pediatric Oncology Symptom Experience (PediQUEST Response), versus Usual Cancer Care in children and adolescents with advanced cancer.

Role: Co-Investigator

Completed Research Support

PCORI, PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

MACK, JENNIFER (PI)

05/01/13-04/30/15

Relapsed childhood neuroblastoma as a model for end-of-life decision-making

To identify perceived burdens and benefits of therapy, and decisional satisfaction or regret of parents of children with progressive neuroblastoma

Role: Co-Investigator

R01CA122217-02, NCI

KODISH, ERIC (PI)

09/04/07-07/31/12

Informed Consent in Pediatric Phase I Cancer Trials

Generate and analyze quantitative and qualitative data that will inform scientific understanding of the process of informed consent of Phase I clinical trials in childhood cancer. Using comprehensive methodology and a solid theoretical framework, we will examine the way that Phase I trials are actually presented, whether and how alternatives like hospice palliative care are introduced, and what parents and older children understand after this communication process. We will discover how the communication process influences parental comprehension and decision-making regarding trial participation

Role: Co-Investigator

R01CA122217, NCI

KODISH, ERIC (PI)

09/04/07-06/30/12

Informed Consent in Pediatric Phase I Clinical Trials

Generate and analyze quantitative and qualitative data that will inform scientific understanding of the process of informed consent for Phase I clinical trials in childhood cancer.

Role: Co-Investigator